food & drink

Vegan food, local food, wild food, brunch, cheap vegan wine, fair coffee & edible flowers.

Food is essential. We eat vegan food because it’s delicious and sustainable. We appreciate health, not as being of a low weight, but as getting nutrients, energy and enjoyment.

For anyone who eats food, we recommend Cowspiracy (available on Netflix).

fair coffee & how to foam plant milk

We enjoy coffee immensely. It is absurd that we are given the choice between fair and unfair coffee. But since this is the case, the fairer option is obviously better so that is all we buy. It is more expensive, but coffee is a luxury brought from far away and it doesn’t need to be extremely cheap. Our favourite is Arvid Nordquist’s Reko. It is fair trade, organic, dark roast and delicious. And it is affordable and very widely available where we live.

 

There are many great ways to brew coffee. We prefer moka pots, because they are very durable (and almost completely recyclable if one did manage to break one) and don’t require any single use filters. They of course also make really good coffee. We often add a bit of cardamom with the grounds for extra flavour. This combination of dark roast, a moka pot and cardamon makes rather strong coffee, that we prefer to drink softened with a foam of plant milk.

 

Plant milks do not always work perfectly with coffee, but have a tendency to separate. This is not dangerous, but it is not very appealing either. There are several tricks to avoid this (dark roast coffee, a lot of milk, warming the milk etc). But what works best is milk made especially for coffee. Oatly makes a foamable oat milk called ikaffe, which is one of my favourite things in the world. It works for any other use that calls for milk too. For those who do not have Oatly where you live, we recommend Almond Breeze Barista Edition.

 

I just recently bought a Bialetti stovetop milk frother from the recycling center, and I have really enjoyed it, using it every day. But such a single purpose item is not of course required. Ikaffe can also be warmed in a small pot on the stove, additionally whisked a bit for foam, or foamed cold by just shaking the carton (if it’s not completely full) for 20 seconds for an iced coffee or when not near a stove. A bit of cinnamon on top or mixed with the milk makes things even fancier.

 

I am currently writing my bachelor’s thesis about packageless design, so options that create less waste are something that interests me. Reusable takeaway coffee cups are a good option for takeaway coffee, but I use my all black ecoffee bamboo cup at school and work for style reasons, but also because working on a computer it has saved a keyboard more times than once.

 

We use store bought plant milks for the added calcium and vitamins, but also convenience. But the perfect option would be to get a glass bottle of fresh oat milk (with that added calcium and such) delivered to the door by a local bicycle courier, who’d also take away old bottles to be refilled. Actually I think that would not only be the perfect option for getting milk but also the perfect job. I think I really want to be an oat milk bicycle courier now.

 

Daniel

leek & potato soup

Leek and potato puree soup is a winterly, easy to make soup. It’s great served with Oatly fraiche, coconut cream or oat or soy yogurt. The soup is beautiful garnished with fresh herb and served with crispy bread.

 

Leek & potato soup

1 big leek*

1/4 onion

3-5 potatoes

2 tbsp vegetable oil (olive, rapeseed, sunflower)

1 tsp dried parsley

1 vegetable stock cube

1l (34 fl oz) water

2 dl (~1 cup) plant cream (I used onion flavoured oat cream)

2-5 dl (~1-3 cups) plant milk (oat, almond, soy)**

Black pepper to taste

 

Chop the leek and onion coarsely, wash and cube the potatoes.  Heat the vegetable oil in a saucepan and add leeks, onion and the dried parsley. Sautee the vegetables for about five minutes, then add potato cubes and give them a good spin. Add the stock cube and water (if you have an electric kettle, boil the water for a swifter process). Bring to a boil, and let simmer until the potatoes are tender. Blend smooth with a mixer or in a food processor. Add vegetable cream and mix. Add vegetable milk if the soup is too thick to your liking! Grind fresh pepper on top, check the taste and add salt, herbs or pepper if needed.

 

*I didn’t use the uppermost deep green parts of the leek, only the white and pale green parts. I kept the greenest parts for use in salads and sprinkles.

~Amir

urban fruit trees

Dark plums in cupped hands

We both live in apartments in wooden houses, and we both have the fortune of having yards with fruit trees. Amir’s yard has three different varieties of apple trees, damson plums and wild raspberries hidden in the back of the yard. Daniel lives surrounded by apple trees, a small but abundant plum tree, red currants and garden raspberries. In the spring we planted strawberries, but lost the fruit to birds (we’re hoping to pick them quicker next summer). We dream of growing all possible trees that bear fruit in this climate. Cherries. Pears.

 

Fruit-topped porridge on wooden tray

Close-up of fruit on the bowl of porrigde

Fruit trees are rather awesome and reasonable things to have close by: they bloom beautifully in the spring and bear fruit in the autumn. And fruits are delicious. They make a basic porridge, that is a good breakfast as it is, a bit more fancy, joyful and sweet. We gathered plums and some damson plums, apples and red currants to top our morning porridge of local whole grain rye, barley and oats cooked in Swedish oat milk.

 

Plums, damson plums and apples on black table

Close-up of apples on black background

For those who do not have fruit trees right outside their door, many people who do have some, get more fruit than they need, and will give some away. Sometimes they leave a bag or a bucket of them by their front gate. We happened to see one bucket full of apples with a sign “free apples” just today. Or you can also simply go ask.

You can also locate public fruit trees and other urban edibles using falling fruit (global) or Satokartta (Helsinki).